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Farewell, Hill Now Readers

Couple walking on Pennsylvania Avenue

Dear Hill Now readers and friends:

We have reached the end of our journey together, at least for now. After almost two years and more than 2,600 posts, Hill Now will cease publication today and for the foreseeable future.

Under the leadership of Sean Meehan, Andrew Ramonas, Tim Regan and Andrea Swalec, the hyperlocal news website area covered the good, and the bad, of the Capitol Hill area since October 2014.

Whether it was a fatal stabbing in NoMa or Food Network star Guy Fieri taking “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” to the H Street corridor, we strived to provide the news that mattered the most to you.

We will keep our archives on this site indefinitely. If you have any questions or concerns, you now can contact us via email at our award-winning sibling publication, Borderstan.

Borderstan, which covers a large swath of Northwest D.C., is expanding next week to include NoMa and the H Street corridor. If you subscribe to Hill Now’s Afternoon Update, you soon will get Borderstan’s Afternoon Update, which will include some articles that focus on Ward 6, as well as stories about Wards 1 and 2.

It has been a privilege to serve the Capitol Hill community over the past 21 months. We enjoyed serving both you, our readers, and the local businesses and organizations that sponsored us. We very much appreciate the advertisers who took this journey with us.

Thank you for reading,

Andrew Ramonas and Tim Regan
Hill Now co-editors

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Meet the Capitol Hill Area’s ANC Candidates So Far for 2016

"I Voted" stickerThe race to enter (or stay in) the lowest level of elected office in the D.C. government officially has begun.

Almost a dozen locals who live in the Capitol Hill area yesterday picked up nominating petitions to serve as members of District’s Advisory Neighborhood Commissions.

Monday was the first day prospective candidates could get the nominating materials. They have until Aug. 10 to collect the signatures of 25 of their neighbors in their single member districts to get on the Nov. 8 ballot.

So far, the candidates include:

ANC 6A

  • Single Member District 01
    • Marie-Claire Brown (704 10th St. NE)
  • Single Member District 02
    • Commissioner Phil Toomajian (631 10th St. NE)
  • Single Member District 07
    • Commissioner Sondra Phillips-Gilbert (1744 E St. NE)

ANC 6B

  • Single Member District 03
    • Brian Ready (622 1/2 I St. SE)
  • Single Member District 04
    • Commissioner Kirsten Oldenburg (423 12th St. SE)
  • Single Member District 07
    • Aimee M. Grace (1219 Potomac Ave. SE)
  • Single Member District 10
    • James Zeigler (1717 East Capitol St. SE)

ANC 6C

  • Single Member District 03
    • Commissioner Scott Price (517 E St. NE)
  • Single Member District 06
    • Heather Edelman (1152 5th St. NE)

ANC 6D

  • Single Member District 05
    • Katelynd Mahoney (1250 4th St. SW)
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Pet-Wise: Uma Recommends In-Home Boarding

Saving Grace Petcare

Pet Wise banner

Pearl Steckler snuggles with Diesel during one of his in-home boarding stays

This sponsored column is written by Saving Grace Petcare owner Grace Steckler and Bonny King-Taylor, director of training and communication at Saving Grace Petcare. Visit www.savinggracepets.com and let us know how we can support you.

It’s 9 a.m. I am working at my home office desk while Uma the bulldog sleeps by my feet. She is a noisy puddle and her snores are making me laugh as I try to help a walker who has stepped in to pick up a key.

She arrived at 7:30 a.m. this morning, dragging her owner up the front steps of our house as if we hadn’t seen each other in years. The truth is, she has spent many weekends with our family, soaking up the love and … don’t tell them we said so … not really missing her people until she sees them again!

During the day, she follows me around, well, like a puppy! Upand down the steps, into the yard, around the corner to mail a letter. She spends a lot of time attending to backyard pee-breaks and snoozing in a cozy dog bed under the tree where she can keep an eye on me, while bird and squirrel watching.

4 p.m. rolls around and my kids burst in from school: running to shower her with kisses. “Uma, UMA! echoes through the house and her tail wags so hard, it looks like it might fall off!

The kids love her so much that they even take turns sleeping on the floor to cuddle with her
every night.

When the week is over, Uma barks to let us know that her family is coming to get her. She leaps for joy to see them, and gets plenty of last minute ear rubs from us on the way out.

Once on the other side of the door, she looks back as if to say, “Four paws up! I will definitely recommend you to my friends. The biscuits were yummy and the hugs were great. Thanks for having me. See you again soon!”

Uma, and hundreds of pets like her on Capitol Hill have enjoyed what we call, “Camp Saving Grace” like this, staying with one of our care providers as if they were our own pets. In fact, we take their comfort and safety so seriously, that we only do in-home boarding.

Whether you prefer our model, or commercial boarding, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Whenever possible, go with an established boarding provider, with a track record for quality care. What the spur-of-the-moment boarders offer in convenience cannot make up for inexperience and being mostly on their own if something goes wrong. Without support systems and oversight in place, they cannot provide the level of security your pet deserves.
  • Visit the boarder’s home in advance. Eliminate surprises by visiting the home of your boarding provider a week or two beforehand. Your doggie can sniff around the house and acclimate to the new smells before the big (sometimes emotionally-charged) departure day.
  • Make sure you provide everything your pet needs to be comfortable and happy. Portion out meals and medications, make sure your equipment: ID tags, leash, harness, bed, bowls, travel crate, toys, blanket, brush, etc., are in good working order.
  • Update your client profile. If you are using a pet sitting service with an online scheduling portal, update your contact information and feeding instructions, select a veterinary clinic, and make sure you have the names and numbers of two local contacts who can help in an emergency. Consider printing this information and handing it to your pet’s boarding provider.
  • Limit treats and extra food on drop-off day. The change of location can initially be stressful for a pup; let the boarding provider get off to a great start and treat your dog after you’ve said goodbye.

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, if your plans change, be sure to let your boarding provider know FIRST. That way, you can go about problem solving knowing your pet is safe, and we can adjust our own schedules.

Preparations like this help us to provide the quality of care Uma loves!

Pet-Wise Action Box

Finding a great pet-life balance when you are busy with work, family and social obligations can be tough. Busy people need all the help they can get and Saving Grace Petcare is here to help you navigate the urban, professional environment across the 20002 and 20003 zip codes.

We’ve learned a thing or two during our 16 years of caring for thousands of every kind of pet you can imagine. In Pet-Wise each week, we will share tips, tricks, behavioral and product recommendations, book reviews and sweet stories about life with pets in the Capitol Hill, Hill East, NoMa and Brookland neighborhoods.

The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Hill Now.

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Hill Pet of the Week: Tigress

Metro Mutts

Tigress is the Hill Pet of the Week. She is a 3-year-old Terrier English Staffordshire mix available for adoption. Here’s her bio shared by the Washington Humane Society shelter on New York Avenue NE:

Hello! I’m Tigress! I was brought to the shelter as a stray several years ago and adopted quickly, but it didn’t work out with my new owner long-term so now I’m back (through no fault of my own!). My previous owner says I’m good with kids and other dogs, but I haven’t been around any kiddos here so the shelter staff doesn’t know for sure. They do know that I’m a smart dog! My old owner had me for over a year and worked with me on housebreaking and taught me tricks like how to give kisses on demand. Maybe my new owners can teach me some new tricks? Could that be you?

To adopt Tigress or other pets from the Humane Society, see the Petango adoption site or call 202-576-6664.

Want your pet to be considered for Hill Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] with a 2-3 paragraph bio and at least three horizontal photos of your pet. Each week’s winner receives a gift bag of dog or cat treats from Metro Mutts, along with 100 Metro Mutts Reward Points.

Known for “What dogs and cats want. What owners need,” Metro Mutts specializes in products and services for passionate pet owners. Now offering individualized dog walking, pet sitting and cat care on H Street NE. Learn more at www.metromuttsdc.com.

Photos via Washington Humane Society

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What to Expect for the Capitol Hill Area This Weekend

Ben's Chili Bowl

The H Street corridor Ben’s Chili Bowl has turned one year old this week, and it’s time to party.

The half-smoke purveyor at 1001 H St. NE is celebrating Saturday with games and a visit from the Nationals Natsmobile.

Also on Saturday, the Southeast Library is having a book sale and  Pacers Running (300 Tingey St. SE) is hosting what it calls “The Great North American Naughtical Beer Mile.”

The thermometer is expected to reach the lower 90s Saturday under partly sunny skies, according to the National Weather Service. But storms might develop in the afternoon. No rain is in the forecast for Sunday, which likely will have a high temperature in the upper 80s.

And according to Jessica Oros, an editor at East City Art (more info about them on FacebookTwitter or through the publication’s newsletter), interesting places to stop for D.C.-area art this weekend include:

Addison/Ripley Fine Art (1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW)
11:30 a.m. Saturday
Artists Isabel Manalo and Christopher Addison plan to discuss the cultural inspirations of Manalo’s exhibit “Unscripted, Naturally.”

Foundry Gallery (2118 8th St. NW)
5-8 p.m. Saturday
Members of the Foundry Gallery are celebrating “summer, outdoors, freedom from school, and the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service” in an all-gallery art show, according to its website.

Studio SoHy (5132 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville, Md.)
7 p.m. Saturday
Studio SoHy is scheduled to present a posthumous exhibit of nationally acclaimed painter Ted Kliman, who had been known for his “soaring, haunting canvasses,” as East City Art’s website noted.

DC Arts Center (2438 18th St. NW)
4 p.m. Sunday
Artist Sarah West is scheduled to discuss her exhibit “Vanishing Point,” in which West combined references to Early Renaissance paintings with digital symbols and artifacts, according to East City Art’s webpage.

The Clay CoOp (328 North Stonestreet Ave., Rockville, Md.)
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
Local clay artists from the D.C. area are slated to showcase their works in Clay CoOp’s event, “Proximity.” All art work present at the show is up for sale, according to East City Art’s website.

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At Home on The Hill: A Garden Oasis in Northeast

At Home On The Hill

This sponsored column is written by Ty Voyles, a licensed Realtor© in the District of Columbia and principal of Fulcrum Properties Group, a team of real estate agents located on Capitol Hill that serves Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia.

Just hitting the market this weekend, 214 14th St. NE is an amazing find on a beautiful tree-lined street, just blocks from Lincoln Park.

This charming townhome features a deep front yard and flowing layout with gleaming hardwood floors throughout. The first floor hosts separate living room and dining room spaces, alongside a spacious updated kitchen with stainless steel appliances and gleaming countertops.

Upstairs, three sun-filled bedrooms include a built-in armoire in the master and plenty of storage. The updated bath features beautiful tile-work and a luxurious shower.

The real gem is the large and well laid out backyard that offers a perfect urban oasis with a storage shed and ample space for grilling, entertaining, and relaxing. This home has it all, including a central location on Capitol Hill. Walking distance to Lincoln Park, Sherwood Recreation Center, the H Street corridor, and tons of local shopping and dining options.

Come see this home and others this weekend. Looking to buy, sell or invest in real estate? Give us a call to get started.

The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Hill Now.

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Pet-Wise: The Sun is Not So Fun… for Your Dog

Saving Grace Petcare

Pet-Wise photo for July 5

This sponsored column is written by Bonny King-Taylor, director of training and communication at Saving Grace Petcare. Visit www.savinggracepets.com and let us know how we can support you.

You hear it all the time, “It’s not the heat…it’s the humidity” when our neighbors complain about D.C. summers.

For our furry friends, the discomforts and dangers of summer weather go much further. It’s the heat, the humidity, direct sun, the air pressure, the asphalt, the sidewalks, hot metal, pests, parasites and pretty much everything associated with what we consider fun in the sun.

The truth is, your pet’s cooling system is notoriously poorly designed. Even short-haired dogs and cats suffer outdoors.

For instance, people tend to think of paw pads as equivalent to shoe leather. In one way, that thought makes sense because critters don’t wear shoes, right? However, it does not take into account that fact that paw pads contain hundreds of veins, very close to the surface of the skin. These veins carry blood and fluids from the heated ground, directly to the heart. And, since dogs perspire only through the tongue and between the paw pads, that heated fluid doesn’t get much chance to cool down before causing the entire body to heat up quickly.

Heat stroke can result, so the #1 rule is: If the street is too hot for YOU to walk on without shoes, your dog should not either!

Always provide plenty of water and shade and consider leaving your pets indoors while you are running errands or eating in an outdoor café.

If you do have to take your dog with you, please NEVER leave him or her in the car. Not even for a minute with the window cracked. A car is a magnified oven and your dog simply cannot defend against the heat.

You might consider a portable cooling pad.

While out, be on the lookout for these symptoms of heat stroke:

  • Increased heart rate (Normal=puppy/120-160, 30lbs or less/100-140, 30lbs or more/60-100)
  • Excessive panting (Normal is 10-30 breaths per minute up to 200 pants per minute)
  • Increased and/or thick drool
  • Bright red tongue & gums or very pale gums
  • Depression, lethargy, weakness, or disorientation (stumbling)
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea (sometimes with blood)

As heatstroke progresses, it can cause seizures, coma, cardiac arrest, and death.

As soon as you see the signs of heatstroke:

Remove the dog from the hot area immediately. Once in a cool place, lower his temperature by placing wet towels over the back of the neck, under the forelimbs, and in the groin area. If possible, increase air movement around him with a fan. (Do NOT apply water in humidity.)

Be careful to use room temperature water. Cooling too quickly and especially allowing his body temperature to become lower than 103° (normal is 100° to 102°) can put the dog into shock or worse.

Transport the dog to his veterinarian as soon as possible. Even if the dog appears to be recovering, he should still be examined for dehydration or other complications.

Resist the temptation to force water into the dog’s mouth. This could cause aspiration and/or choking. Allow free access to water if the dog wants to drink on his own.

Prevention is key

  • Keep pets with predisposing conditions like heart disease, obesity, older age, or breathing problems cool and in the shade. Even normal activity for these pets can be harmful.
  • Breeds with short brachial systems: Pug, Bulldog, Pekinese, Boxer, Shih Tzu, Chihuahua should be kept out of heat a much as possible.
  • Do NOT wet dogs down in high humidity. The excess water will heat up, making things worse!
  • Walk in the shade and on grass as much as possible.
  • When the temperature is over 90° or 80% humidity, reduce the time outside to no more than 15 minutes.
  • When returning home, guide the dog to a cool area of the house.
  • Take care of yourself! You are your dogs’ best defense. Hydrate, shade yourself, strategize and be alert

Finding a great pet-life balance when you are busy with work, family and social obligations can be tough. Busy people need all the help they can get and Saving Grace Petcare is here to help you navigate the urban, professional environment across the 20002 and 20003 zip codes.

We’ve learned a thing or two during our 16 years of caring for thousands of every kind of pet you can imagine. In Pet-Wise each week, we will share tips, tricks, behavioral and product recommendations, book reviews and sweet stories about life with pets in the Capitol Hill, Hill East, NoMa and Brookland neighborhoods.

The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Hill Now.

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Hill Pet of the Week: Bandit

Metro Mutts

Bandit is the Hill Pet of the Week. He’s a 4-month-old cat who can be adopted from City Dog Rescue’s City Kitties program. Here’s his bio shared by his foster parent, Katie Baumer:

Young Bandit recently took a lengthy road trip up to DC to become a City Kitty. The little guy was off to a rough start and was congested with a cold, and also underweight! Even with the uphill battle, he was quick to take in his new surroundings and explore and cuddle. He’s now chubby and cured, and you can tell how thankful he is about his new life. He’s so happy to have some space to run around in and does lots of silly kitten jumps and leaps. He also loves to be near his person. Whether it’s running between your feet as you walk around, or snuggling up next to you, Bandit will be there keeping you company. He loves to be picked up and carried around, and purrs easily to show his contentment.

To adopt Bandit, see City Dog Rescue’s website.

Want your pet to be considered for Hill Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] with a 2-3 paragraph bio and at least three horizontal photos of your pet. Each week’s winner receives a gift bag of dog or cat treats from Metro Mutts, along with 100 Metro Mutts Reward Points.

Known for “What dogs and cats want. What owners need,” Metro Mutts specializes in products and services for passionate pet owners. Now offering individualized dog walking, pet sitting and cat care from two store locations on Capitol Hill, on Barracks Row and on H Street NE. Learn more at www.metromuttsdc.com.

Photos courtesy of Katie Baumer

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What to Expect for the Capitol Hill Area This (Long) Weekend

D.C. fireworks on July 4, 2010 (Photo via Flickr/Tim Kelley)

A parade, late-night food trucks and fireworks are coming to the Capitol Hill area this Independence Day weekend.

On Sunday night, “Midnite BBQ” is returning for its third year with vegan and vegetarian cuisine at the DC Pavilion (1399 5th St. NE).

Then on Monday, the Barracks Row Fourth of July Parade is slated to kick off from 8th and I streets SE at 10 a.m. Fireworks are scheduled to begin at 9:09 p.m. on the National Mall.

The temperature is expected to reach the low 80s on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, according to the National Weather Service No rain is expected, except for Independence Day.

And according to Jessica Oros, an editor at East City Art (more info about them on FacebookTwitter or through the publication’s newsletter), an interesting place to stop for D.C.-area art this weekend is:

Washington Sculptors Group (Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center at 40 South Carroll St., Frederick, Md.)
3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Cartes Blanches” is a group exhibition that is part of the 2016 Sculpture Now series.

Photo via Flickr/Tim Kelley

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At Home on the Hill: Grand Victorian, Two-Car Garage and Perfect for Starbucks Lover

At Home On The Hill

This sponsored column is written by Ty Voyles, a licensed Realtor© in the District of Columbia and principal of Fulcrum Properties Group, a team of real estate agents located on Capitol Hill that serves Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia.

209 3rd St. SEWe talk about amazing locations a lot. After all, Capitol Hill itself is an amazing location. But this spot really is hard to beat. This house is on a tree-lined street, one block from the Library of Congress, and two blocks from the Capitol South Metro. And it truly steps from Starbucks and numerous restaurants and shops along the Pennsylvania Avenue corridor.

209 3rd St. SE is a beautiful Victorian on a quaint street on the southeast side of Capitol Hill. The four finished levels include five bedrooms, three full baths, and a powder room. The house also featured beautiful period details and creature comforts such as hardwood floors, broad casings, high ceilings, and three fireplaces.

The fantastic first floor features a formal living room, separate dining area, and a large eat-in kitchen. The second story delivers a den, full bath, and two junior bedrooms. The top floor master suite impresses with a large bath and lovely roof deck where you will love enjoying a morning cup of coffee or evening drink.

The finished basement, which offers plenty of extra living space, has its own kitchenette. A magnificent magnolia tree shades an impressive rear courtyard. Off-street parking and amazing storage completes the package via a two-car garage with soaring second story loft.

This home will be hitting the market soon! If you want to learn more, give us a call.

The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Hill Now.

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Pet-Wise: Fireworks are Coming … Preparing Your Dog for July 4

Saving Grace Petcare

Fireworks

This sponsored column is written by Bonny King-Taylor, director of training and communication at Saving Grace Petcare. Visit www.savinggracepets.com and let us know how we can support you.

According to the American Humane Society, July 5 is the busiest day of the year in animal shelters.

Frantic pets can exert amazing strength and strategy to escape the noise and confusion caused by fireworks, banging pans and the other explosive parts of our Independence Day celebrations. They’re strongest impulse is to get away from what they perceive as a threat, so they’ll “Houdini” out of crates, jump fences, slip through doors and end up on the street, alone and afraid.

You can help your dog by reducing any possibility of escape:

  • Do NOT take your dog to outdoor events of any kind, not even backyard picnics.
  • Take your last evening walk before 6 p.m.
  • Limit your dog’s range by using a covered crate in a cool, dark and quiet place.
  • If a crate is not available, make a bathroom or pantry as comfortable as possible (extra blankets and pillows that you won’t mind being torn up can help).
  • Provide plenty of water and a limited amount of super high value treats in distracting devices like frozen Kongs and interactive games. (An upset stomach either from stress or gobbled food during a stressful time can lead to a mess.)
  • Instruct guests to be very careful with doors and windows and to leave a stressed dog alone.
  • Be sure your dog wears identification, even while in the house.

You might also consider using a calming product like Rescue Remedy or DAP that can help take the edge off the assault on your dog’s acute hearing.  These products are known to help with separation anxiety, crate stress and general sensory sensitivity, but should only be counted on for minor help during the extreme stress of the holiday.

Use every effort to remove any physical dangers first!

We hope you never need this information, but if the worst occurs and your pet is lost, contact the District’s 311 non-emergency number to be connected with an Animal Control officer and call the Humane Society at 202-BE-HUMANE (202-234-8626) for support.

Take a moment to get connected with an organization like Lost & Found Dogs DC  for a comprehensive plan. The better prepared you are, the less likely you will ever need their help!

In a future column, we’ll give you the best tips for helping a lost dog.

In the meanwhile, tell us in the comments what you do to keep your pets calm during loud times like the 4th, or during thunderstorms?

Finding a great pet-life balance when you are busy with work, family and social obligations can be tough. Busy people need all the help they can get and Saving Grace Petcare is here to help you navigate the urban, professional environment across the 20002 and 20003 zip codes.

We’ve learned a thing or two during our 16 years of caring for thousands of every kind of pet you can imagine. In Pet-Wise each week, we will share tips, tricks, behavioral and product recommendations, book reviews and sweet stories about life with pets in the Capitol Hill, Hill East, NoMa and Brookland neighborhoods.

The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Hill Now.

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Hill Pet of the Week: Stormy

Metro Mutts

Stormy is the Hill Pet of the Week. She is a Papillon mix, who is available for adoption. Here’s her bio shared by Josh White, who is fostering her for the Washington Humane Society:

Stormy is a total lovebug, with her favorite activities being cuddles and belly rubs.  She has a tendency to snore and enjoys nothing more than cozying up on a warm lap after trotting around on her walk around the block.  She also likes having her hair brushed out and looks adorable after her trip to our local groomer for a nice “summer do.”  She is friendly with other small dogs and walks well on a leash, bouncing along while stopping occasionally to smell the roses.  She’d probably be fine with calm, older children.  Most importantly, Stormy is looking for a loving forever home who will give her peace, stability and kindness for the rest of her golden years.

To adopt Stormy, please contact White at [email protected].

Want your pet to be considered for Hill Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] with a 2-3 paragraph bio and at least three horizontal photos of your pet. Each week’s winner receives a gift bag of dog or cat treats from Metro Mutts, along with 100 Metro Mutts Reward Points.

Known for “What dogs and cats want. What owners need,” Metro Mutts specializes in products and services for passionate pet owners. Now offering individualized dog walking, pet sitting and cat care on H Street NE. Learn more at www.metromuttsdc.com.

Photos courtesy of Josh White

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What to Expect for the Capitol Hill Area This Weekend

Anacostia River (Photo via Facebook/11th Street Bridge Park)

The grand opening of Navy Yard’s public marina is set to bring free nautical crafting, kayaking and other activities to The Yards on Sunday.

If you go outside this weekend, expect only minimal clouds and ample sunshine, according to the National Weather Service. The temperature is expected to hit the mid 80s on both Saturday and Sunday.

And according to Jessica Oros, an editor at East City Art (more info about them on FacebookTwitter or through the publication’s newsletter), interesting places to stop for D.C.-area art this weekend include:

Joe’s Movement Emporium (3309 Bunker Hill Road, Mount Rainier, Md.)
9 to 11 a.m. Saturday
Creative Edge Collaborative leads a discussion on how independent film disrupts Hollywood’s business model.

Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum (2 Massachusetts Ave. NE)
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday
Join the National Postal Museum for Family Day filled with free children’s art activities.

39th Street Gallery (3901 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood, Md.)
1 to 3 p.m. Saturday
Artist-in-Residence, Jodie Ferrier, discusses her last four months working at the Gateway Arts Center.

Brentwood Arts Exchange (3901 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood, Md.)
2 p.m. Saturday
Carol Barsha discusses her exhibition, “Between the Real and the Imagined.”

Arlington Arts Center (3550 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va.)
6 to 9 p.m. Saturday
Arlington Arts Center opens “Strange Landscapes, Austin Shull Reconciliation and Materialized Magic.”

Hamiltonian (1353 U St. NW)
7 to 9 p.m. Saturday
Hamiltonian welcomes Christie Neptune in her Washington, D.C., solo debut, “She Fell From Normalcy.”

Blind Whino (700 Delaware Ave. SW)
8 to 11 p.m. Saturday
In “Querencia,” Taylor White explores human nature and emotion through the human form.

Washington Studio School (2129 S. St. NW)
Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday
Join the fourth annual Big Draw at Washington Studio School.

(Up)Rising Festival (600-2300 Blocks of Rhode Island Ave. NE)
Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday
The second year of this choose-your-own-art-adventure festival includes over 45 artists and organizations celebrating local art.

Photo via Facebook/11th Street Bridge Park

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Pet-Wise: Rain

Saving Grace Petcare

Pet-wise rain

This sponsored column is written by Bonny King-Taylor, director of training and communication at Saving Grace Petcare. Join the love-fest by visiting www.savinggracepets.com and letting us know how we can support you.

After the crazy, wet spring we’ve had, it looks like we have a few more storms on the horizon.

Rain is inevitable, and all dog owners need to be prepared. Wet days are no excuse to keep a dog cooped up indoors. Don’t be the cause of the disappointment in your dog’s eyes when denied the best part of their day outside: sniffing, exploring and catching up on the neighborhood pee-mail.

All dog-owners should own a good raincoat and boots for themselves. Fumbling with an umbrella and a leash (and possibly a bag of poop) is neither safe nor enjoyable. The best rain jackets have sleeves more suited to a gorilla’s arms than a human’s. This feature provides extra protection in the case of lost gloves or other emergency as hands can be tucked up inside the sleeves. A savvy dog walker will pull leash and hands inside the sleeve of the jacket, keeping them both warmer and drier.  And, if your leash doesn’t dry quickly enough, try one of these.

Dogs can also benefit from a rain coat. Keeping a dog’s undercoat dry is vitally important during stretches of wet weather. Without a blow dryer, it can take the undercoat several hours to dry, just in time for the next trip outside. Damp fur can make a dog susceptible to bacterial and fungal skin infections.

What to do if your dog won’t wear one?  Let them shake! A dog can remove 70 percent of the water from it’s fur in just four seconds simply by shaking. Stand nearby with a towel ready to work at paws, legs and (gently) ears.

Rain is fun! Think back and try to remember a time in childhood when a rainy day elicited happy cries of anticipation instead of groans of frustration. Remember jumping in puddles and floating sticks down storm drains and streams. Recapturing some of that childlike spirit can help to encourage you to spend longer outside when it’s wet. Rain releases a subtle fragrance called petrichor from the earth, making the walk more pleasant for both you and your scent-sensitive pup and that’s a win-win.

So next time Mother Nature decides to give us a shower, put on your gear (here are some more ideas), take a deep cleansing breath, and head outside. You’ll be giving a gift to both yourself and your dog!

Finding a great pet-life balance when you are busy with work, family and social obligations can be tough. Busy people need all the help they can get and Saving Grace Petcare is here to help you navigate the urban, professional environment across the 20002 and 20003 zip codes.

We’ve learned a thing or two during our 16 years of caring for thousands of every kind of pet you can imagine. In Pet-Wise each week, we will share tips, tricks, behavioral and product recommendations, book reviews and sweet stories about life with pets in the Capitol Hill, Hill East, NoMa and Brookland neighborhoods.

The views and opinions expressed in the column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Hill Now.

2 Comment

Hill Pet of the Week: Cupcake

Metro Mutts

Cupcake is the Hill Pet of the Week. She’s a 1-year-old cat who can be adopted from City Dog Rescue’s City Kitties program. Here’s her bio shared by her foster parent, Jessie Hillenbrand:

Cupcake recently made her way up from North Carolina. She keeps consistent with her namesake and is as sweet as can be. She’s approximately 1 year old and is a purr machine who loves to snuggle, play and lick anyone petting her. Did I mention she’s teeny tiny? She’s full-grown and only about 6lbs. Cupcake is also short haired, making her a minimal shedder. She currently lives with a dog and has absolutely no issues.

She will also be great with other cats and can be a confidant to your already-existing fur friend. Please consider adopting Cupcake. She’s a real sweetheart!

To adopt Cupcake, see City Dog Rescue’s website.

Want your pet to be considered for Hill Pet of the Week? Email [email protected] with a 2-3 paragraph bio and at least three horizontal photos of your pet. Each week’s winner receives a gift bag of dog or cat treats from Metro Mutts, along with 100 Metro Mutts Reward Points.

Known for “What dogs and cats want. What owners need,” Metro Mutts specializes in products and services for passionate pet owners. Now offering individualized dog walking, pet sitting and cat care from two store locations on Capitol Hill, on Barracks Row and on H Street NE. Learn more at www.metromuttsdc.com.

Photos courtesy of Jessie Hillenbrand

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